The Performance360 Development Continuum

At Performance360, we follow a four-step process of development.

  1. Develop Basic Motor Skills
  2. Introduce Demand
  3. Become Proficiency & Resilient
  4. Pursue Performance

It is important that the person spend time developing all of the requisite skills each step has to offer to ensure that they remain in a position of eustress and yield adaptation, not distress and yield destruction.

STEP 1: Develop Basic Motor Skills (0-30 Days)

The first few weeks of any program are centered around sound movement pattern and simple tasks. This is the purpose of the PHASE 1 program and where all of our focus lies. It is about laying a successful foundation so the member can be successful long term.

Timeline:

0-30 Days

Programming:

PHASE 1

Goals:

Motor Learning – Creating proper movement pattern so that pattern can sustain load in the future (goblet squat precedes back squat).

Joint Resilience – Taking the body through complete ranges of motion.

Progress Through:

Biomechanical Efficiency – The body slowly working better in a particular movement when it comes to mobility, due to the improvement of joint and muscle interaction (for example, an improved squat because of better ankle mobility developed by performing the pattern).

Strength Focus:

Structure – Strength through the development of the muscles, joints, and connective tissue of the body.

Reps & Load:

6 – 8 Reps – So that we can focus on building the muscle and connective tissues without overdoing it to the point that mechanics break down.

Up to 60% – Loads greater than 60% risk being too heavy and developing compensatory patterns.

Tasks:

Simple – Goblet squat , not a back squat.

Partial – Hang muscle clean, not a hang clean. Skill should be developed in layers, not all at once.

Positional Demands:

Easy – Whether training strength or conditioning, we want to put members in a position to maintain their positioning and not develop poor movement habits.

With step one, the objective is to prep the athlete for more to come. Nothing more.

STEP 2: Introduce Demand (30-90 Demands)

Think of this as more of an extension of Step 1, and not necessarily a different step altogether. It takes what you’ve developed in an athlete in their first approximately 30 days, and it makes it harder through load increase.

Timeline:

30 – 90 Days

Programming:

PHASE 1 into ALL LEVEL

Goals:

Tendon Strength – From a health perspective, tendons are typically four weeks behind our muscles when it comes to adaptation, meaning your triceps and biceps might develop the strength for heavy overhead pressing long before your tendons can handle it.

From a performance perspective, taking the time to develop healthy tendon tension will create a stronger pull on the bone and a more powerful movement.

Why Phase 1 is Frequently Rx’d “3131”
Tendons are best developed under 30 – 70 seconds of time under tension. When we prescribe 6 Goblet Squats at a 3131 pace, the member is performing very sound squats under 48 seconds of tension (6 reps x 8 seconds per rep).

Core Strength – Preparing the core to stabilize the spine at heavier loads, produce power in the Olympic lifts, and create good mobility overhead.

With step two, we want to take the athlete and begin to give them a little bit more stress without losing sight of the fact that they are still in the developmental phase.

STEP 3: Become Proficient & Resilient (90 Days – Multiple Years)

Once we have a solid structure, we can now take members through a more focused development of strength and skill. Tasks become more complex, load increases, and we begin to challenge positioning more in a state of fatigue. Here, we are after General Physical Preparedness (GPP).

In this phase of training, we have to main objectives.

Proficiency – We are not looking for competency, but proficiency. We want to be very capable of performing a movement before we begin worrying about its peak performance (Step 4). This doesn’t mean we spend a few learnings how to do a hang clean before we start training our 1-rep max.

Resilience – We want to prove we can stay healthy and free of injury. Training should be a tool to achieve this, not an obstacle to it.

Timeline:

90 Days+ – There is no limit one can remain in Step 3 and see benefit. Progress will continue indefinitely.

Programming:

ALL LEVEL

Goals:

GPP – General Physical Preparation (GPP), where the focus is on developing broad fitness skills that leave you prepared for a variety of tasks.

10 Biomotor Abilities – The development of our ten biomotor abilities concurrently: Strength, Power, Speed, Anaerobic Conditioning, Aerobic Conditioning, Local Muscle Endurance, Proprioception (Agility), Mobility, Stability, Posture.

Introduce Power – Power cannot be achieved without a base level of strength, making it a worthless skill to focus on until now.

Progress Through:

Neuromuscular Efficiency – Whereby we improve as a result of our Central Nervous System (CNS), specifically, our brain getting better at communicating to our muscles when it comes to moving heavy loads.

Muscular Development – Adding muscle and continuing to enhance our foundation of support and output.

Strength Focus:

  1. Function – Strength through the development of our CNS.
  2. Structure – Strength through the development of the muscles, joints, and connective tissue of the body.

Strength Reps & Load:

5 @ 70-80% –  The 5-rep set has a three-part functional, structural, and conditioning benefit, making it the only rep scheme that achieves all three. See Physiology section for complete details on why.

Tasks:

Complex – Deadlift, not KB hinge.
Full Movement – Clean, not hang muscle clean.

Positional Demands

Challenging – There should be some thoughtful difficulty in maintaining position whether it’s strength or conditioning.

STEP 4: Pursue Performance (Optional, 2+ Years)

Step 4 is not required for one to achieve success with fitness. Those who move onto Step 4 need to understand that here, risk goes up. We’re moving much heavier weights, our position is being greatly challenged, and the stress may walk the line between eustress and distress. Careful recovery steps need to be taken in order to be successful training performance long-term.

Timeline:

2 Years+ – Only when we have displayed a high level of proficiency and resiliency should we begin to pursue our highest levels of performance.

Programming:

ADVANCED

Goals:

Performance – The main objective here is not health, but performance, making this the least pragmatic choice for the majority of the general population. We take on greater injury risk, a more beat up body, and a more deliberate focus on recovery.

Progress Through:

Neuromuscular Efficiency with some additional muscle building

Strength Focus:

  1. Function – Strength through the development of our CNS.
  2. Structure – Strength through the development of the muscles, joints, and connective tissue of the body.

Strength Reps & Load:

1-3 @ 85% for Strength Development – Advanced folks will only see their strength improve as a result of frequently training its highest output. While adding muscle in a structure-based environment will help, it will not be the primary contributor to strength gains in this person.

8+ Reps @ 60% for Muscle Development

Tasks:

More Complex – Greater positional demands such as 1-3R strength lifting, and heavier loads at more demanding pace in conditioning.

At the end of the day, this is all quite logical and common sense. Take beginners, teach them how to move, then teach them how to move under load, gradually impose different positional and conditioning demands to create further adaptation.

-Dave Thomas
@VirginiaDave

2019-03-21T21:43:20+00:00

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